anish@aout.io

The Disappearing Act - Part I

Blog Post created by anish@aout.io on Jul 19, 2016

The Disappearing Act — A magic trick? An illusion? Maybe a Movie?  Well, it’s complicated, but if you are a business owner, recruiter, HR or hiring manager…. You have come across this act many times in your workplace, which leads to frustration; even to the level of lost business or customer.

 

Ambiguous though it may sound, but the disappearing act is a reality (more so often now a days).

 

It has been observed that almost 37% of the offered candidates do not show up on the day of joining, in the IT & ITES industry.  The offer-drop percentage is even more in other industries such as hospitality, retail, BFSI and manufacturing etc.

 

The disappearing act is every recruiter’s and hiring manager’s night mare.  The recruiter’s effort to discover the reason of his candidate’s mysterious disappearance along with the distressed hiring manager, who was very sure of the candidate’s positive interest level towards the job, often leads to a big rabbit hole.

 

Though the disappearing act is an unethical practice, it’s a reality and often organisations can’t do much about it in an open market.

 

The intention of this article series is to go through the practical intricacies of this global issue and try to help anyone who has had that sinking feeling when a candidate tells them they have changed their mind or even worse does the disappearing act even without notification.

 

“If finding great/right talent is hard, then making the offered candidates join the Company is even harder.”

 

  • What do you think about the above statement?
  • Who do you think is responsible for this act? Is it the Organisation or the Candidate?
  • Can you share a real time experience?

 

Are you currently using any method or solution to solve this problem?

 

The insights into some common hiccups from your feedback will help all who share this problem, positively.  I strongly believe that a Company’s success is directly tied to hiring better candidates than its competitors.  

 

End of part 1.

 

Cheers,

Anish Padinjaroote

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